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Sex Culture      Sept-Oct 2014
  • Owen FINAL-lt

    The Vulnerability of a Poet

    In a new biography of the World War I poet Wilfred Owen (1893–1918), we read his poems about a London rent boy with “violet eyes” and the “smell of the moss,” another about two male ghosts who sleep together ...

  • Guibert-self

    Traces of an Artist Who Died Young

    THESE TWO BOOKS provide excellent examples of Hervé Guibert’s talent and style. A French writer and photographer who died from AIDS in 1991 at the age of 36, Guibert drew much of his work from his own life and his love of photography.

  • Carol Queen

    Legacies of the Sexual Revolution

    CAROL QUEEN, PhD, is an author and activist whose work as a sex-positive feminist began in the 1970s and continues to this day. She was an early organizer for LGBT equality, an AIDS activist in the ’80s, and a sexologist who has lectured and written on all aspects of human sexuality.

  • Forster-2

    Forster Without Maurice (still gay)

    THIS YEAR MARKS the centenary of E.M. Forster’s completion of his initial version of the novel Maurice. The most autobiographical of Forster’s six novels, Maurice stands out for its forthright depiction of a homosexual hero whose journey culminates in his embracing his sexual identity and finding a male life partner.

  • Mark Ruffalo and Matt Bomer in The Normal Heart

    Soon the Spotted People

    IT TOOK LARRY KRAMER nearly thirty years to get a film made of The Normal Heart. His play about the AIDS crisis opened at the Public Theater in New York in 1985.

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Cock and Bull

Here are three stories that are united in their theme of a right-wing politician getting caught with something where it probably doesn’t belong:  1. John Schindler is a professor at the Naval War College who’s known for his conservative views, notably his defense of government secrecy and his disdain for whistleblowers like Chelsea Manning and [...]

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At the Corner of Hollywood and Gay

Reel to Real: Portrayals and Perceptions of Gays in HollywoodCurated by Bob Pranga and Steve Nycklemore THE INTERSECTION of Hollywood and Highland is undoubtedly the center of tourism in Tinseltown. The Dolby Theater, Grauman’s Chinese Theater, the Wax Museum, and countless other destinations vie for the attention of visitors from all over the world. Just [...]

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Got Milk?

Speaking of the AFA, which once concerned itself with great social issues such as same-sex marriage, consider their other cause célèbre of the summer: a commemorative stamp issued by the U.S. Postal Service to honor Harvey Milk. It was a milestone because the stamp recognizes Milk precisely for his work as a gay activist. Declaring [...]

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Quipping for Equality

It was one of those stage-managed events in which a politician visits a popular venue and has a few awkward encounters with “real people” for the local press. But this time—at the Franklin Barbecue in Austin, Texas—President Obama met his match when he went to pay for his burgers and fries, and a male cashier [...]

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Simone de Beauvoir Comes Alive with Violette

Violette. A film by Martin Provost  YOU HAVE TO HAND IT to the French for making a biopic about a writer known in the U.S., if at all, only in academic and feminist circles. Violette is an examination of the ravaged emotional and romantic life of a deeply personal writer who found her greatest supporter in [...]

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Yves Saint Laurent’s Genius Is Captured in a New Biopic

Yves Saint Laurent Directed by Jalil Lespert   ONE OF THE PITFALLS of the biopic is the lead actor’s temptation to do a full-throttle imitation of the person whose life story is being told. Unless you’re Meryl Streep channeling Margaret Thatcher or Julia Child, or Marion Cotillard as Edith Piaf, the results can seem like bad parody. [...]

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