Top-New

Issue Categories Archives: AIDS

Seasons in Hell

DAVID FRANCE’S HISTORY of AIDS opens with a memorial service for Spencer Cox, an ACT UP activist, to whom we come back in the epilogue. In between are approximately thirteen years of Hell. Although How to Survive a Plague pretty much follows the plot of the documentary film he released four years ago with the same title, the difference between the two is enormous. When the film came out, this reviewer wondered if a book would not give us more nuance, more insight into what people were really thinking in those ACT UP meetings we saw on screen. Well, here is the answer to that wish.

Continue Reading 0

Gay Resilience and HIV Prevention

WE HEAR a lot about advances in HIV treatment, the use of Truvada or PrEP to prevent HIV infection for the sexually active, and the latest programs designed to promote safer sex. Largely unreported, however, has been a huge shift toward addressing “upstream” mental health issues—such as depression, substance abuse, or partner violence—because it has finally become clear that gay men who don’t feel good about themselves or their lives are less likely to protect themselves and more likely to take risks.

Continue Reading 0

The Man Who Took On The Times

A 2015 book by Samuel G. Freedman, Dying Words: The AIDS Reporting of Jeff Schmalz and How It Transformed The New York Times, documents Schmalz’ profound effect on American print media. In a personal interview, Freedman, a professor at Columbia University and the “On Religion” columnist for The Times, discussed the atmosphere at the paper before Schmalz’ arrival.

Continue Reading 0

Where HIV Has Not Been Tamed

of HIV among black MSM are not due to higher rates of risky behaviors. Black gay and bisexual men have fewer sexual partners than their white counterparts and are less likely to use substances before sexual activity that might promote risk-taking behavior. The factors that make black men more vulnerable have built up over decades and are directly related to lower rates of health insurance and access to health care.

Continue Reading 0

Wide Use of PrEP Raises Hopes—and Questions

IN 2012, San Francisco-based biopharmaceutical giant Gilead Sciences launched Truvada as the first antiviral drug approved by the FDA as a means of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV prevention.

Continue Reading 0

Doctors without Protocols

For Americans in their thirties and younger, all of this is ancient history, which is why it is good to have Sensing Light, a novel written by a physician who first began working with AIDS patients in San Francisco in 1986.

Continue Reading 0

A South African Justice Speaks Out

SOUTH AFRICAN Constitutional Court Justice Edwin Cameron is a leading activist on gay rights and HIV/AIDS whom the late Nelson Mandela called a “new hero for South Africa.”

Continue Reading 0

HIV Survivors and the ’16 Election

  “I’M THE LUCKIEST unlucky person in the world. No one wants to be the last man standing,” reflected Peter Greene, one of the eight long-term HIV survivors from the San Francisco Bay area, featured in the new documentary Last Men Standing. Greene personifies the ambiguous fate of many long-term HIV survivors. Having been voted […]

Continue Reading 0

Wider PrEP Use Could Reduce HIV Infections

  LAST MAY, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) took a major step toward transforming HIV prevention in the U.S. by recommending that healthcare providers consider prescribing pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to uninfected patients who are at substantial risk of becoming infected. The CDC issued new clinical guidelines that could lead to a significant […]

Continue Reading 0

HIV Activism in the Age of PrEP

   Survival vividly recounts the story of this involvement.SEAN STRUB is the stereotypical “boy from Iowa” who came East as a teenager, landing first in Washington, D.C., where he was an elevator operator at the U.S. Capitol, and then, a couple of years later, in New York City. By the late 1970s, he was an […]

Continue Reading 0