Top-New

Article Categories Archives: Book Review

Why We Remember Charles Henri Ford

  Charles Henri Ford: Between Modernism and Post Modernism by Alexander Howard Bloomsbury. 251 pages, $114.     IT’S QUITE POSSIBLE that only a few readers of this magazine will know who Charles Henri Ford was. Yet here we have a lengthy and heavily annotated book from Bloomsbury Press about his work—or, rather, about certain aspects of […]

Continue Reading 0

The Child Is the Father of the Poet

The leafy photo of a tender, teenage Ashbery picking cherries in the family orchards was taken by his father Chet, an accomplished photographer as well as a farmer. Its use as the entire cover, with a superimposed “postcard home” bearing the title, is a choice of genius, presumably by jacket designer Sarahmay Wilkinson. The photo has meaningful links to every chapter of the book.

Continue Reading 0

Warhol Off the Wall

IT HAS BEEN three decades since Andy Warhol died at New York Hospital (on February 22, 1987) of complications from gall bladder surgery. In 2017, over a dozen books about Warhol or his art, ranging from the frivolous to the academic, were published. After Andy and 3D Warhol can be found at either end of that spectrum.

Continue Reading 0

How to Survive a World War

The greatest asset of Fighting Proud is that it will send many readers to the library in search of the numerous other biographies, histories, and personal accounts from which Bourne so lavishly quotes.

Continue Reading 0

Freak Out!

THE MOST striking feature of Studio 54 is its heft: Amazon lists the shipping weight as 8.2 pounds. Almost any page of this substantial publication confirms what people already know about the legendary nightclub: that it was a playground for celebrities, a temple for disco, and a brand of spectacle not seen before in a nightly venue.

Continue Reading 0

How to Get to Barbary Lane

Maupin’s latest book, the memoir Logical Family, is his first book of nonfiction, yet he brings to it the unique storytelling gifts that have animated his fiction, and he more than delivers on the “tap dancing” that will win his readers’ attention and engagement.

Continue Reading 0

Gay Shades of Garp and Gump

The Heart’s Invisible Furies is about the life of a gay man in Ireland from the 1950s to the present.

Continue Reading 0

Short Reviews

Reviews of Writers Who Love Too Much; David Bowie Made Me Gay; Sexagon: Muslims, France, and the Sexualization of National Culture; and Our Horses, Ourselves.

Continue Reading 0

The Neo-Ridiculous Technique

The Ridiculous Theatre Company allowed Ludlam free rein to write, perform in, and direct a series of dazzling, perverse, non-naturalistic comic pieces. His intent was to counter the humorless accounts of gay men’s marginal, miserable lives that had dominated American theater.

Continue Reading 0

Romantic Poets

The Shelley-Byron Men, which originated as a talk, is half text, half appendices containing excerpts from works by various writers.

Continue Reading 0