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When John Cage Composed in Words

ONE OF THE MOST eclectic artists of the 20th century was avant-garde composer John Cage, who was also a philosopher, a visual artist, and a writer.

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He Wrote the Book of ‘Similisexual’ Love

[This] novel is filled with coded homoerotic hints and references. Perhaps the most overt is when Jennison says to Philip: “Nice youngster that Master Gerald is! Not extraordinary that strangers should take a fancy to him, eh? Pretty boy!”

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The Taxidermy of Short Fiction

Dave Madden, in his late thirties, holds a doctorate in creative writing and teaches at the University of San Francisco. His work to date has been nonfiction, and it has won critical acclaim.

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And Tell Sad Stories of the Death of Queens

Nevertheless, Ibell tries hard to rescue the plays that the critics serially panned after his last commercial hit, The Night of the Iguana. Plays like And Tell Sad Stories of the Death of Queens, Steps Must Be Gentle, and Now the Cats with Jeweled Claws were experimental, openly concerned with homosexuals, and mostly one-acts.

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Against Foucault

Vita Sexualis discloses how Ulrichs was more than just a gay rights pioneer, as important as he was in that role. According to Leck, Ulrichs was “the first modern European thinker to propose that a spectrum of cultural and individual variations … is natural.”

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A Foremother of Lesbian Publishing

notes, and a useful index. Joanne Passet has done justice to a complex personality who played an indispensable role in the development of lesbian publishing. Barbara Grier loved books and was on a mission to make lesbian-oriented books readily available to their intended readers. Her relentless drive to fulfill this mission led to conflict, which makes for good reading in a biography; but much of the conflict came from Grier’s own shortcomings, which makes her achievement seem bittersweet.

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A Second Look at Bernard Perlin

Michael Schreiber’s One-Man Show is an exhaustive chronicle of Perlin’s life and work, a kind of hybrid monograph–biography, sumptuously illustrated with reproductions of the artist’s drawings and paintings, as well as many photographs of Perlin and his circle, including the work of his friend George Platt Lynes.

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The Man Who Loved Oliver Sacks

AT AGE 48, brokenhearted over the death of his partner, Bill Hayes moved to New York City in order to reinvent himself. “I had simply reached a point in my life where I had to get away from San Francisco—and all the memories it held—and start fresh.” During that first fresh-start summer, Hayes began seeing a few other men. Among them was Oliver Sacks …

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Berlin As Metaphor

  Goodbye Heiko, Goodbye Berlin: A City Divided Then Reunited After Fall of Infamous Wall by Owen Levy BookLocker.com, Inc. 281 pages, $18.95     WHAT IS IT that one loves about a person or a city? Does loving a person or a place mean that you’ve found something there that corresponds to something deep within […]

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Canada ≠ Utopia

  Queer Progress: From Homophobia to Homonationalism by Tim McCaskell Between the Lines Press. 510 pages, $39.95   IT SEEMS CANADA is so adulated by cosmopolitan progressives in the U.S. that it’s almost a crime to say anything negative about the place. Universal health insurance is awesome, the social safety net is enviable, and Prime […]

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