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Issue Categories Archives: Theatre

The Shock of the Everyday

New faces emerged when in January 2017 a series of mosaics became part of the tiled walls of the 72nd Street Station at the new Second Avenue Subway. Vik Muniz’ Perfect Strangers was the transformation of photographs into life-size mosaics installed throughout the mezzanine and entrance area.

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Stardom in the Age of the Selfie

Reading this book, which is subtitled My Life in Stories and Pictures, is akin to sitting with Cumming as he leafs through his ever-growing scrapbook of accomplishments, loves lost and won, and collaborations with other name-brand stars.

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Playwrights Who Rewrote the Rules

By writing plays that call attention to the unreality of theater, Albee and Shaffer called attention to the inauthenticity of modern life: both how people are influenced by movies and commercials and how they fashion their sexuality to conform to socially celebrated norms. Relying heavily upon the conventions of Greek tragedy, plays like Albee’s The Goat and Shaffer’s Equus attempted to return theater to its ancient roots in which one wore a mask to deliver a primal authenticity that could not be enacted in everyday life.

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Can Falsettos Still Be Relevant?

WILLIAM FINN’S Falsettos, the AIDS-era musical now revived on Broadway, may be viewed by some as an odd period piece, by others as an operatic pastiche, a manipulative emotion-fest, or a stirring work of historical reconstruction. What may determine your response to the play—which shifts from 1979 to 1981 between two acts—is your willingness to believe in the musical comedy as a vehicle able to convey emotional truth rather than just cheap sentiment.

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A Farewell to Edward Albee

Edward Albee died on Friday, September 16th, 2016, at the age of 88. He passed away at his summer home in Montauk, New York, after a short illness. He was one of the most important and iconic American playwrights of the 20th century.

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The Definitive ‘Miss Bette Davis’

KIRK FREDERICK’S biography of “male actress” Charles Pierce (1926-1999), Write That Down, greets the eye with an iconic photograph of Pierce impersonating Bette Davis, his signature role.

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No Modifier Required

Although [Terrence] McNally’s gay bona fides are beyond question, he resists being labeled a “gay playwright.”

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The WOW of Theater

These two books on overlapping topics are a pleasure to hold and to look at. Memories of the Revolution is a standard-sized paperback with a collection of photos in the center, and The Only Way Home Is through the Show is a large paperback art book, lavishly illustrated throughout.

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The Passion of the Wilde

  The Judas Kiss A play by David Hare Directed by Neil Armfield Ed Mirvish Theatre, Toronto, March 22–May 1 Brooklyn Academy of Music, NYC, May 11–June 12     THE MOST POPULAR playwright of his day, Oscar Wilde’s professional reputation was temporarily overshadowed at the end of his life by his private notoriety—as either […]

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Scenes from a Modern Marriage

  Dada Woof Papa Hot A play by Peter Parnell Directed by Scott Ellis At the Lincoln Center Theater   IN OUR AGE of same-sex marriage and parenting, a play titled Dada Woof Papa Hot seems sure to tap into the GLBT zeitgeist. Playwright Peter Parnell, as if to pick up where Terrence McNally left […]

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