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Friends and Fans on Marilyn Monroe’s Sexuality

    MARILYN MONROE made her movie debut seventy years ago, in the 1947 vehicle Dangerous Years, and her career took off from there—thanks in large part to her five-year relationship with acting coach Natasha Lytess. Monroe would bring Lytess on-set to approve her work—much to the chagrin of her male directors—and Lytess was responsible […]

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How Marriage Equality Made Me an American

  ON THE MORNING that my husband Joe and I got married, the sun shone warmly on our chilly necks, absorbing the bite of the low, steady breeze floating across the pond behind our condo. Two swans drifted on the surface of the water as we took our positions on the dock with Mary, the […]

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Falling in Lust

    I REMAIN HAUNTED by a remark a famous novelist made during her public talk at Sewanee University a few summers ago. She lamented, with much audible derision, that too many poets now write “lust poems,” as she called them, rather than “love poems.” The implication was that poems celebrating lust as opposed to […]

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The Making of Baseball’s First Female Pro

While I find it unsettling that in 2017 it remains a political act to share the truth about one’s sexual orientation, without shame, to either loved ones or total strangers. But it is and always has been the writer’s job of a writer to illuminate what is hidden. For doing just that in her memoir, Ila Jane Borders is to be applauded.

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Stuart Timmons and the West Hollywood Pride Tour

  STUART TIMMONS, who passed away on January 28th of this year at the age of sixty, was an award-winning journalist, activist, and historian who loved telling a great story and exposing the truth. He is best known for two books, The Trouble with Harry Hay, a biography of the cofounder of the Mattachine Society […]

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Tennessee Roams New Orleans

      The Tennessee Williams Festival in New Orleans is 31 years old this year. Next year, its smaller sibling, The Saints & Sinners Festival, will celebrate its 15th anniversary. After years of being held at separate times, they are now held together, in the last week of March. (Williams’ birthday was March 26th.) […]

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Gay Paris

    OF ALL THE THINGS that Paris is famous for—the historic neighborhoods, the amazing museums, the spectacular food—what’s often overlooked is Paris’ importance in LGBT history and culture. France was the first modern country to decriminalize homosexuality—in 1798, almost two centuries before the U.S. From that time on, Paris has remained a relatively free […]

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Those Liberation Blues

In keeping with its name, Gently Down the Stream proceeds at a leisurely pace, but Gabriel Ebert’s hyperactive Rufus keeps the emotional narrative percolating. In the latter third of the play, the arrival of Harry as an unguarded, naïve artist seems to bring us right up to the present. But …

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Frida Kahlo’s Mexico City

Frida Kahlo (1907-1954) is best known for her many self-portraits, 55 in all, which comprise around half of her corpus of paintings.

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Fun Down There  

  The defeat of North Carolina’s Republican governor, Pat McCrory, last November ran against the general tide of the election, and his loss was clearly due to his support for the infamous HB2 or “bathroom bill” that bars transgender people from using the public restroom of their choice. The law triggered a boycott of North Carolina […]

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