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Issues Archives: 100 Years of Subterfuge

November-December 2017

‘I grew up in Bombay, home of the Hijra.’

Born in India in 1947, Sir Salman Rushdie was educated at Cambridge University and came of age in England—indeed he is a knight of the realm—but has lived in New York City for much of his adult life. It was his fourth novel, The Satanic Verses, that provoked a fatwa on his life, issued by Iran’s Ayatollah Khomeini in 1989.

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Thomas Mann’s Secret Sharer

Thomas Mann had had homosexual affairs before marrying Katia Pringsheim, and afterwards still had powerful, though repressed, yearnings for young men. His subtle homosexual themes appeared in Tonio Kröger and Death in Venice. In Mario and the Magician, the conjuror Cipolla hypnotizes the handsome young Mario, who is humiliated and forced to kiss him in public.

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Inside West Side Story

When Leonard Bernstein died on October 14, 1990, Jerome Robbins, Arthur Laurents, and Stephen Sondheim gathered for an intimate funeral service with Bernstein’s closest friends and family. It was the last time the four men were together.

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Picturing ‘The German Vice’

Stephan Likosky shares his findings regarding this important episode in queer history as it is reflected on postcards, which were an early medium by which ordinary people could learn about current events and be exposed to new ideas. Indeed, the importance of postcards cannot be overstated.

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A Priest’s Book Stirs the Faithful

Donald L. Boisvert had submitted a review that was quite critical of Martin’s book [Building a Bridge: How the Catholic Church and the LGBT Community Can Enter into a Relationship of Respect, Compassion, and Sensitivity], while Brian Bromberger proposed a defense of it, having interviewed the author in early summer. So it seemed logical to share Boisvert’s critique with Bromberger so as to allow the latter to comment.

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Letters to the Editor

  ‘Queen’ Piece Deemed Unworthy To the Editor: Hidden away in the July-August issue with beautiful commentary on remarkably accomplished people—Lincoln Kirstein, Tennessee Williams, Allen Ginsberg, Gore Vidal—is a silly, degrading, mean-spirited essay, “What Makes a Queen a Queen?” On the one hand, I am dismayed by how many kinds of queen the author knows—nap […]

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Memories of John Ashbery (1927–2017)

Though he liked to drink (too much, truth to tell), John [Ashberry] didn’t frequent gay bars. People came to him. In Paris he was partnered with the poet Pierre Martory for several years and later provided translations of a volume of his poems.

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Two Friends Recall Mark Merlis (1950-2017)

THE AUTHOR of four groundbreaking novels, Mark Merlis died at age 67 on August 15, 2017, in Philadelphia’s Pennsylvania Hospital. The cause of death was pneumonia, related to ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s disease, which he had been diagnosed with just a year ago.

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BTW

Still Together The Greeks never disappoint. The latest find is a 2,500-year-old bit of graffiti on the remote Aegean island of Astypalaia with an inscription carved in stone that reads “Nikasitimos was here mounting Timiona” (Νικασίτιμος οἶφε Τιμίονα). Plus, there’s a carving of two giant phalluses to commemorate the event—or ongoing relationship, as the use […]

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Joy Ladin Is Not a Nature Poet

JOY LADIN is the author of eight books of poetry, including her latest collection, Fireworks in the Graveyard (Headmistress Press, 2017). She is a chaired professor of English at Yeshiva University. …

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